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Ten Best Herbs to Grow Indoors


Many herbs—including oregano, thyme, rosemary, and sage—are easy to grow indoors just by  taking a cutting from an existing outdoor plant. You can grow herbs indoors this winter and add that fresh just -picked taste to your meals.  Growing herbs indoors is easy you don't even need special lights just a bright window.
 
 
 
 Techniques for Growing Herbs Indoors
Rooting a cutting
Snip off a 4-inch section, measured back from the tip. Strip off the lower leaves and stick the stem into moist, soilless mix, such as perlite and/or vermiculite. Cover with glass or clear plastic to add humidity and keep the growing medium-moist.
Transition to indoors
Before the first fall frost start moving your potted herb plants toward their winter home. Instead of bringing them directly inside, put them in a bright, cool "transitional zone," such as a garage, entryway, or enclosed porch, for a few weeks.
Once they've acclimated, move them to an area with lots of sun (south-facing windows are brightest, followed by east or west views). But protect them from heat and dryness. Most herbs prefer daytime temperatures of about 65 to 70 degrees F, although they can withstand climbs into the 70s. It's especially important that night temperatures drop at least 10 degrees—down into the 50s would be better—to simulate outdoor conditions.
Here are the best herbs for growing on windowsills and the smart techniques you need to keep them happy and healthy until you can plant outside again.
http://www.burpee.com/Herbs/Basil/Basil-san-remo-prod000502.html?siteID=SSshjdEcDWk-ZYDbgoCogOyw.8UlirWfmA&cid=AFFBasil: Start basil from seeds and place the pots in a south-facing window—it likes lots of sun and warmth.
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
http://www.cooksgarden.com/herbs/herb-herbs-de-provence-collection-prod000882.html?siteID=SSshjdEcDWk-VdBfK2EecZUEyyNLMTznjw&cid=AFFBay: A perennial that grows well in containers all year long. Place the pot in an east, or west, facing window, but be sure it does not get crowded—bay needs air circulation to remain healthy.
 
 
 
 
 
http://www.cooksgarden.com/herbs/herb-herbs-de-provence-collection-prod000882.html?siteID=SSshjdEcDWk-VdBfK2EecZUEyyNLMTznjw&cid=AFFChervil: Start chervil seeds in late summer. It grows well in low light but needs 65 to 70 degrees F temperatures to thrive.
 
 
 





 
http://www.cooksgarden.com/herbs/herb-herbs-de-provence-collection-prod000882.html?siteID=SSshjdEcDWk-VdBfK2EecZUEyyNLMTznjw&cid=AFFChives: Dig up a clump from your garden at the end of the growing season and pot it up. Leave the pot outside until the leaves die back. In early winter, move the pot to your coolest indoor spot (such as a basement) for a few days, then finally to your brightest window.
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
http://www.cooksgarden.com/herbs/herb-herbs-de-provence-collection-prod000882.html?siteID=SSshjdEcDWk-VdBfK2EecZUEyyNLMTznjw&cid=AFFOregano: Your best bet is to start with a tip cutting from an outdoor plant. Place the pot in a south-facing window.
 
 


http://www.cooksgarden.com/herbs/herb-herbs-de-provence-collection-prod000882.html?siteID=SSshjdEcDWk-VdBfK2EecZUEyyNLMTznjw&cid=AFFParsley:

 You can start this herb from seeds or dig up a clump from your garden at the end of the season. Parsley likes full sun, but will grow slowly in an east, or west, facing window.
 

 



 
 Start with a cutting of rosemary, and keep it in moist soilless mix until it roots. It grows best in a south-facing window.
 
 
  
http://www.cooksgarden.com/herbs/herb-herbs-de-provence-collection-prod000882.html?siteID=SSshjdEcDWk-VdBfK2EecZUEyyNLMTznjw&cid=AFFSage: Take a tip cutting from an outdoor plant to start an indoor sage. It tolerates dry, indoor air well, but it needs the strong sun it will get in a south-facing window.
Tarragon: A dormant period in late fall or early winter is essential for tarragon to grow indoors. Pot up a mature plant from your outdoor garden and leave it outside until the leaves die back. Bring it to your coolest indoor spot for a few days, then place it in a south-facing window for as much sun as possible. Feed well with an organic liquid fertilizer.

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Tags: herb, herbs, ten best herbs, grow indoors, plant, flowers, edible, basil, thyme, chives

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