Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from 2016

5 New Roses to Plant in 2017

How to Make a Storybook Cottage Garden

No other type of landscape can enchant quite like a cottage garden. Charming mixes of flowers, edibles, perennials, shrubs, annuals, espaliered fruit trees, evergreens and more give these gardens a wide variety of colors, heights, and shapes, creating storybook surroundings. Their anything-goes style makes them a great way to dip into gardening if you haven’t tried it before. Before you dig in a trowel, let these 12 delightful examples inspire you.





Capability Chris


Pai

3. Some architecture insists on a cottage garden. A house in England with a thatched roof would look as though it forgot to put on its pants without a cottage garden dressing it. Stone walls, wild mounds of flowers, plants of different heights and lots of color make this home a wonderland.






Fall Plants for the Southwest Cottage Garden

Fall is the best time of the year to plant in the Southwest Cottage garden. The temperatures are falling to a bearable level; the rains pick up, and weeds are not nearly as much of a problem. Also, my favorite vegetables are the brassicas that thrive in the fall. Even though we are still experiencing some triple digit temperatures, the weather is on a downward slide to cooler weather.  Now is the time to get your zone 9 gardens ready for fall planting. I have to admit I do a lot of my fall gardening in pots, where they not only provide fall and winter interest but offers a beautiful edible bounty by early spring. 



Fall has distinct planting benefits. Autumn's cooler air temperatures are easier on both plants and gardeners. The soil is still warm, allowing roots to grow until we experience a freeze.  Myth no. 1 Desert Southwest does not freeze. Wrong!  It is true we do not have a very long ‘winter’ season, but we do have about one may two weeks where the temperatures dip into the lo…

Spring Comes Early to Las Vegas Gardens

Geraniums winter over in my small Garden Shed/Greenhouse.  They bloom all winter and really put on a show in February and March.  the dry hot heat of the Las Vegas desert clime does not agree with them so they go semi dormant and wait until cooler weather to bloom again.




The Nectarine is an early bloomer but still behind the peach and apricots and the apples.  Fruit trees seem to love the desert soil and heat and they appreciate the “no insects”.  Other than the birds we have a near perfect crop of fruit.


Petunias love the cool weather and bloom through the winter and on until mid summer and then the heat bids them ado. The petunias act like a perennial and can last several years.


  My apricot proved to be a real winner in this heat. It grew over 20 feet in two years and has produced bushels of apricots which went right into apricot preserves.

Hardy Stock never lets me down. It grows and blooms most of the year and last for many years without replanting. The fragrance of the stock plant…